Fine Art Collector-Fine Art Books

15 Sep

New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artists Choice by Artists A Complete Documentation of the New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals: 1951-1957.    Readers’ opinion:    Amazon.com  Almos…

Source: Fine Art Collector-Fine Art Books

Best Books on Art

8 Oct

New York School Abstract Expressionists

New York School Abstract Expressionists Artists Choice by  Artists: A Complete Documentation of the New York Painting  and Sculpture Annuals;  1951-1957 [Hardcover]

  “Highly recommended.”
~CHOICE, current reviews for academic libraries, February 2001:
“The book is unique; it can be used as a reference for  artists’ biographies, for exhibition  documentation, or as the history of a specific artistic movement.
General readers; undergraduates through faculty.”  

Readers’ opinion:
Almost Perfect – Very Important! ~Amazon.com   

American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s

American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s: An Illustrated Survey
With Artists’ Statements, Artwork, and Biographies

​   OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC TITLE ~ CHOICE, 2003
“This excellent publication builds on the earlier [above] publication. It has broadened  the scope to include artists from throughout the US, rectified…omission of African    American artists… and concentrated on 88 artists…excellent layout and superb  photographs. Highly recommended”  ~ CHOICE,
CURRENT REVIEWS FOR ACADEMIC  LIBRARIESJuly/August 20

American Abstract and Figurative Expressionism

American Abstract and Figurative Expressionism: Style is Timely Art is Timeless

​ CHOICE CURRENT REVIEWS FOR ACADEMIC LIBRARIES, January 10, 2010
“Highly recommended. Libraries supporting both studio
and art history programs at the lower undergraduate and
above; general readers.” ~ CHOICE  
 ​ 

Albert Kotin American Abstract Expressionist of the 1950s

Albert Kotin American Abstract Expressionist of the 1950s

on September 20, 2016
Format: Library Binding
This isn’t my first review of a NY School Press book. I get incredibly excited and anxious when I hear a new title comes out. Ms Herskovic’s books are incredibly accurate due to her research. Its not what “Joe tells Susan”. Its digging for the truth. What appears is a sumptuous, fact filled, tour d’force. I have always heard of Albert Kotin but had no idea of the breadth of his work. From his easel paintings and murals with the WPA to his breathtaking Abstract Expressionist canvases, you get to see the journey of an incredibly gifted artist. You do not have to know that he was one of the major artists of the New York School and participated in all the Annuals. Just turn the pages and you know you are in the midst of greatness. Large color photographs, over 350 pages, and artist’s statements, letters from his famous artist friends, fine portraits, and period photos, take you on a journey through the difficult hard working life of a very special talent!

          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Ed. by Marika Herskovic,
ISBN: 0967799406
ISBN: 0967799414
 ISBN: 0967799422
ISBN: 0967799430


Hardcover with jacket, 12 x 9 inches,

Albert Kotin Early New York School Abstract Expressionist

29 Jun

Albert Kotin  Early New York School  Abstract Expressionist  

Albert Kotin belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist artists. He was among the 24 artists from the total of 256 participants who were included in the famous “9th St.” Show, (1951) and in all the following New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals from 1953 to 1957. These Annuals were important because the participants were chosen by the artists themselves.


Alexander Calder wrote in 1968: 

“As long as there are people such as Al Kotin, there is no danger to art.” 

From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

This blog intends to enlighten not only our own generation but the subsequent generations to come to reevaluate art’s mainstream and to shed new light on the American art heritage. It may also serve as an invaluable tool for preventing and fighting art-forgeries.

Albert Kotin the early years: 1923-1930

“My earliest memories are of my parents scraping down the walls of our home on which I had drawn. Beginning in 1923 I studied at the New York Arts Student League and at The National Academy of Design and with Charles Hawthorn in Provincetown.”

Albert Kotin, Blacksmith, 1928. Oil on canvas.Photograph
Private collection
All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

“In 1929 I went to Paris for two years and studied at the Academiè Julian, the Grand Chaumiere and at the Atelier de Fresque under the wonderful old boy (Paul Bodin) who in his youth had worked with Puvis de Chavanne.”

From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection

All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository

Media in category “Académie de la Grande Chaumière”

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1930

Watercolor on paper, 11 3/4 x 12 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Nude Study, 1930

Sepia on paper, 16 3/8 x 9 1/2 inchesPrivate collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.


Albert Kotin-The Depression-Federal Art Project (FAP)
1931-1943.

During The Great Depression in 1931 Albert Kotin returns to the USA:

“On my return to New York late in 1931 the depression was at its deepest. For a time I assisted a mural painter who was doing a church. Later I was commissioned to do a mural for the Sociology Department of New York University. (The painting has since disappeared, it was as if my parents were still scrubbing down walls).”

From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection. All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin during the Great Depression participated in The Federal Art Project (FAP) and in the WPA. 

As with the other Federal cultural projects of the time, the 

program sought to bring art and artists into the everyday life of communities throughout the United States, through community art centers, exhibitions and classes. 

“When the WPA was formed I went with them as an easel painter.”

From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection. All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

 

Albert Kotin, The Sand Pit, 1936

Watercolor on paper, 14 1/4 x 19 inches

Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, NY

All Rights Reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, The Sand Pit II, 1936

Watercolor on paper, 14 1/4 x 19 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Foreclosure, 1937

Watercolor on paper, 16 x 21 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin resigned from the WPA as an easel painter in 1938 after winning first prize in a National Mural Competition. Kotin was awarded fist prize by the Treasury Department for Murals in the Arlington, New Jersey.

The Post office murals were funded by the Section of Fine Arts under the Treasury Department and not the WPA.

Albert Kotin, Murals (The City) and (The Marsh), 1938

Oil on canvas. Image courtesy of the USPS. Photograph taken by USPS Supervisor, 2006.

The Arlington name was dropped and changed to Kearny on January 1, 1955.

Albert Kotin Traveled to Mexico, 1939-1940

Albert Kotin, Mexican Holiday, 1939

Gouache on paper, 19 x 13 1/2

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, The Cock Fight, 1939

Oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Clown, 1940
Oil on board, 23 1/2 x 17 1/2
Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.


Albert Kotin participation in Military Service
World WarII 1941-1945.

From Albert Kotin’s recollection of World War II. 

“But then the war in Europe began to make its presence felt. All Federal Buildings were canceled and the nation began girding for war.I too girded.I became a draftsman for a while and when I felt it wasn’t enough I invited the army to call me in. The army opened its arms. I became an instructor in cartography at the Engineers School at Fort Belvoir, VA.”From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection. All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

THE GI BILL

The official title was the “Servicemen’s Readjustment Act” and President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed it in 1944, even before the war ended.

For most, the educational opportunities were the most important part of the law. WWII veterans were entitled to one year of full-time training plus time equal to their military service, up to 48 months. The Veterans Administration paid the university, trade school, or employer up to $500 per year for tuition, books, fees and other training costs. Veterans also received a small living allowance while they were in school.

Thanks to the GI Bill, millions who would have flooded the job market instead opted for education. In the peak year of 1947, Veterans accounted for 49 percent of college admissions. By the time the original GI Bill ended on July 25, 1956, 7.8 million of 16 million World War II Veterans had participated in an education or training program.

Hans Hofmann at his summer school in Provincetown under auspices of the “G.I. Bill” provided for veterans of World War II.

Albert Kotin’s recollection:

“On my discharge (honorable) I resumed painting and went to study 

with Hans Hofmann who had been a friend and whom I respected highly.”From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection. All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Hans Hofmann, Provincetown, 1947. photo ©

Courtesy Maria Hans & Renate Hofmann Estate.

Early Paintings after returning from World War II.

Albert kotin, Untitled, 1947

Oil on canvas, 24 x 20 inches.

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Strugle between Plant and Insects, 1948

oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches

Exhibited:

Group & 2,” New School for Social Research, November 28 – December 14, 1948

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Moment of Flight, 1948

Oil on canvas, 21 x 36 inches

Exhibited:

“Group & 2,” New School for Social Research, November 28 – December 14, 1948

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Halloween Night, 1948

Oil on canvas, 20 x 28 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

“Albert Kotin in his oils – pure abstractions – mood is established in color.

It is usually lyrical mood regulated by the unusually rythmic, in fact musical way in which Kotin varies intervals and directions of movement.”

Art Digest, 1951.  

Albert Kotin, Chinese Holiday, 1949
Oil and enamel on canvas, 36 x 22 inches
Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

In 1949 Albert Kotin joins THE CLUB and becomes a voting member.

The Abstract Expressionists were also identified as the New York School action 

painters. There wasn’t any actual “New York School” where artists took classes; rather, the term is shorthand for a loose association of avant-garde artists who lived in New York in the mid-twentieth century, and who made art in the Abstract Expressionist style. The New York School artists in 1949 established a meeting place in New York’s Greenwich Village, The Club, which became a hub of Abstract Expressionist debates and activities. 

Albert Kotin’s recollection:

“Also during these years The Club had been founded and I was a Voting Member (Member of the Board). We launched the Abstract-Expressionist Movement with the 9th Street Show. For some years this show was continued by the Stable Gallery as the New York Artists Annuals. I was in each of them.” 

From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection. All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin exhibits at The Hacker Gallery


Albert Kotin’s recollection:


“The same year of the 9th St. Show, 1951, I had my first one-man show 

at the Hacker Gallery.”From Albert Kotin personal notes. Private collection. All rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1950

Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches

Illustrated:

American Abstract Expressionists of the 1950s page:191

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1950

Oil on canvas, 30 1/8 x 35 7/8

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

The urgent need for gallery space and public exposure resulted in the now famous “9th St.” Show in 1951 in New York City. 

Franz Kline, Poster for “9th St.” Show, 1951

Linoleum cut, 16 x 8 1/2 inches

“New York Painting and Sculpture First Annual”

From the book:

New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artists Choice by Artists

© New York School Press, 2000

The “9th St.” Show made it clear that the definition of first and second generation

Abstract Expressionists was misleading, often nothing more than a critical ploy to further historical and commercial acceptance of a limited number of artists showing with

established galleries.

Albert Kotin participation in the 9th St. Show and all the New York Artists Annuals
Albert Kotin, Predators, 1951

Oil on canvas, 36 x 28 inches

Exhibited:

“9th St.” Show, 1951

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1951

Oil on canvas, 57 x 37 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

Albert Kotin, Spanish Dancers, 1951

Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches

Exhibited:

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1951

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1954

Oil on canvas, 70 x 58 inches

Illustrated:

New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artists Choice by Artists page:208

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates



Albert Kotin, Whispering Rain, 1957

Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

Albert Kotin, Westerly, 1957

Oil on canvas, 69 x 79 inches

Illustrated:

American Abstract and Figurative Expressionism page: 141

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1957

Oil on canvas, 48 x 36 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

“TENTH STREET ARTISTS:INDIVIDUALS PREVAIL OVER THE GROUP”


Tenth Street a Geography of Modern Art by Harold Rosenberg

1959. Art News Annual, XXVIII

     

                                                                              

                           

Albert Kotin, October, 1958-59

Oil on canvas, 50 x 38 inches

Exhibited:

Grand Central Modern, 1958

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

Albert Kotin, Tropic, 1958

Oil on canvas, 50 x 38 inches

University of California, Berkeley Art Museum; Bequest of Albert Kotin

Exhibited:

Hans Hofmann and his Students, 1963-64An Exhibition Circulated by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY

Illustrated:American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s: An Illustrated Survey page: 192

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

New York Figurative Expressionism of the 1950’s
represented a trend where
“diverse New York artists countered the
prevailing abstract mode to work with the figure.”

 

By the mid and late 50’s in many of his works Albert Kotin demonstrated the importance of the figure.

Albert Kotin, Downbeat, 1954

Oil on canvas 42 x 32 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

Albert Kotin, Self- portrait, 1962

Pen on paper

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

Albert Kotin Messenger 1967

Oil on canvas 14  10 inches

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates

Albert Kotin Head c1968.

Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 36 inches

Illustrated:

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates




Albert Kotin Testigos 1968, Quadriptych.

Oil on canvas, 104 x 63 inches.

Exhibited:

University Art Museum, Mexico City,

1968

Private collectionAll rights reserved by the artists or his delegates.

 Albert Kotin is included in the books:

All the books may be obtained at:

Albert Kotin is included in the books:

All the books may be obtained at:

Albert Kotin-Abstract Expressionism

13 Jan

Albert Kotin-Abstract Expressionism


Alexander Calder wrote in 1968:
As long as there are peo
ple such as Al Kotin, there is no danger to art.

Albert Kotin-Absract Expressionism-Action Painting

Albert Kotin, Moment of flight1948

Oil on canvas, 21 x 36 inches

All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin, Struggle Between Plant And Insects,1948

Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inchesExhibited: New School for Social Research, 1948
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1950
Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches
All rights reserved by the artist or by his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1951

Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches
Oil and enamel on canvas, 57 x 37 inches

All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates. 

Albert Kotin, Spanish Dancers,1950

Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches

Exhibited: Philadelphia Academy of Fine Art, 1951
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin, Predators, 1951 

Oil on canvas, 36 x 28 inches
Exhibited in the “9th St.” Show in 1951
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.



Albert Kotin, Downbeat, 1954

Oil on canvas, 36 x 28 inches.

Exhibited: Grand Central Moderns, NYC, 1958.
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin, Untitled, 1954 

Oil on canvas, 70 x 58 inches

Exhibited:
Grand Central Modern, 1958
Tanager Gallery, 1959
New York Hilton: 1959-1964
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, 1994
( catalog p.32 illustrated )
Book: amazon.com p.208 illustrated
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

 Albert Kotin, Phoenix , 1957

Oil on canvas, 57 x 36 inches

Exhibited:
Grand Central Modern, 1958
Tanager Gallery, 1959
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin, Whispering Rain,1957

Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 inchesExhibited:
Grand Central Modern, 1958
Tanager Gallery; 1959
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin, Westerly, 1957

Oil on canvas, 69 x 79 inches

Exhibited:
Grand Central Modern, 1958
Reading Art Museum, 1995-1999
Sidney Mishkin Gallery, Baruch College, 1994 ( catalog p.20 illustrated )
Rockford Art Museum, 2004 ( catalog p.48 illustrated )
Book: amazon.com p.141 illustrated
All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Albert Kotin. Untitled, 1958

Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 inches

Exhibited:

Grand Central Moderns, 1958

All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

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Albert Kotin, Predators, 1951. Oil on canvas, 36 x 28 inches. All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates. This painting was exhibited at the famous 9th Street Art Exhibition, (9th St. Show) in May 21-June 10, 1951

Albert Kotin, Predators, 1951

Albert Kotin (1907-1980) belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist Artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem De Kooning, Franz Kline and others became the leading art movement of the postwar era.

Conrad Marca-Relli, Untitled, 1958. Oil on canvas-collage on canvas, 38 x 47 1/2 inches. All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Conrad Marca-Relli, Untitled, 1958

Conrad Marca-Relli was a New York School Abstract Expressionist artist. This period was later defined as The Abstract Expressionist Era. His "monumental collages" were hailed as a major art form. His works are in the collections of the leading museums of America and Europe and in private collections around the world.

Joe Stefanelly, Wednesday, 1958. Oil on canvas. 50 x 60 inches. All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Joe Stefanelly, Wednesday, 1958

Joe Stefanelli (born March 20, 1921) also known as Joseph J. Stefanelli belonged to the New York School Abstract Expressionist artists whose influence and artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized around the world. According to John Russell art critic of the New York Times. "He has for a long time had the gift of color that sings out in tune." As one of the youngest artists of the Abstract Expressionsit Group he participated in the first artists’ annual called the "9th St. Show" His paintings are seen in a number of museums throughout the US and Europe.

Nicolas Carone, Untitled, 1957.  Oil on canvas, 60 x 74 inches. All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Nicolas Carone (1917-2010) was among the most prominent artists associated with the American Abstract Expressionism.

Giorgio Cavallon, Untitled, 1974-75. Oil on canvas, 72 x 74 inches. All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Giorgio Cavallon, Untitled, 1972-1975

Giorgio Cavallon (1904-1989) was born in Sorio, near Vicenza, Italy. He was influenced early in his career by Dutch modernist Piet Mondrian. In New York City during the 1930s and 1950s, he was closely associated with Arshile Gorky, William De Kooning, and other abstract expressionists. Since the late 1960s and 1970s, Cavallon has framed his surfaces with small, dark shapes in order to control the large, unified rectangles of light color. Cavallons paintings have been described as exuding a subtle, atmospheric light reminiscent of Mediterranean villages.

Julius Hatofsky, Untitled, 1990. Oil on artist board, 30 x 40 inches. All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Julius Hatofsky, Untitled, 1990

Hatofsky first studied as a teenager in the art classes given by the Federal Art Project.  After serving in WWII, he continued in New York at the Art Students League and Hans Hofmann School and in Paris at Académie de la Grand Chaumiere.  He painted in New York until moving to San Francisco in 1961 to teach at the Art Institute where he remained for 33 years.  During the 1960s he worked in a Bay Area Abstrct Expressionist mode; however, by the 1970s his paintings moved toward Figurative Expressionism.    He died in Vallejo, CA on January 1, 2006.

Anki King, Fall, 2011. Oil oncanvas, 54 x 74 inches. All rights reserved by the artist or his legal delegates.

Anki King, Fall, 2011

Anki King (1970- ) was born near Oslo, Norway. In 1991 Anki King was accepted in the three year program at Oslo Drawing and Painting School before moving to New York in 1994. In New York she  has built a strong career as a painter and exhibits frequently both in Europe and in USA. Her direct and solemn work requires pondering of the image for a deeper search and understanding. Recently she has begun making sculpture part of her expressive language.

Recommended Books:

New York School Abstract Expressionists: Artists Choice by Artists;  

American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s: An Illustrated Survey;

American Abstract and Figurative Expressionism: Style is Timely Art is Timeless;

Home | Abstract Expressionism-Action Painting 1950s | American Figurative Expressionism Contact Us Fine Art Collector-Fine Art Books

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